Junkitecture – repurposing construction materials

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Jonathan Glancey wrote a piece on the subject of junkitecture in the Guardian a few weeks back.

The Jellyfish theatre, which opens next week, is being built from the detritus of markets, timberyards and building sites; from redundant school furniture, hand-me-down front doors, recycled nails and pretty much anything that local residents and businesses have contributed

The Jellyfish theatre in London. Photograph: Graeme Robertson

The Jellyfish theatre in London. Photograph: Graeme Robertson

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I was suitably inspired to track down other examples of architectural repurposing.

Superuse.org was partly initiated by Rotterdam-based 2012Architecten, who ‘design products and buildings and develop strategies to facilitate the transition to a sustainable society.’ Or , rather more snazzily – From Superuse to Recyclicity.

Here are some of their projects – more details on their website.

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Wind turbine wings reused in a playground

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Re-used steel beams and cable reels at Villa Welpeloo

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Re-use of aluminium window frames for an espresso bar

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Car windows as shelving in a shoe shop

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The Loading Dock is an interesting website. It’s a non-profit building materials reuse centre in Maryland, USA, and serves as a national model for communities interested in starting a reuse facility.

Its mission is improve living conditions for people by providing inexpensive housing improvement and building materials, whilst at the same time keeping material out of the waste stream. Stock includes paint, timber, plumbing fixtures, doors, cabinets, windows, caulks, mouldings and appliances.

It’s architectural salvage with a clear social mission. Donors – including both contractors and individuals – save on storage and / or disposal costs, whilst housing organisations, community centers and neighborhood improvement groups get access to materials for minimal handling fees.

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WRAP - Reclaimed building products guide

WRAP - Reclaimed building products guide

And for building professionals in the UK there’s a useful WRAP publication – A guide to procuring reclaimed building products and materials for use in construction projects – which you can download here.

80 pages of detailed information, including quick wins and a catalogue of product pages for 33 common reclaimed materials from roof tiles through to carpets.

And the WRAP website aimed at reducing construction industry landfill waste by 2012 is here.

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And finally, if you ever find yourself with a spare 1965 Boeing 727 fuselage you could do something like this.

A repurposed Boeing 727 fuselage

A repurposed Boeing 727 fuselage

The master bedroom

The master bedroom

As re-used by Hotel Costa Verde, Costa Rica.

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3 Responses to “Junkitecture – repurposing construction materials”

  1. owenp Says:

    From a furniture design perspective, the Jellyfish reminded me a little of the Campana’s Favela chair, which was made from odds and ends of wood from a São Paulo slum.

    Interview and article here: http://designmuseum.org/design/fernando-humberto-campana

  2. Contractors Says:

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  3. Roofing Edmonton, Edmonton Roofing, Roofing Repair, Says:

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