Engineering a low carbon built environment

by
Commercial building carbon emissions

Energy associated with heating, cooling, lighting and ventilating commercial buildings typically accounts for two thirds of the carbon emissions. Diagram: Doug King

With all the recent hoo-haa on eco-bling it is easy to think you’ve read the Royal Academy of Engineering’s report having scanned a few amusing headlines.

In fact Engineering a low carbon built environment: The discipline of Building Engineering Physics is thoughtful, readable and without mention of the dreaded phrase. You can download the full report here. It doesn’t take long to read.

Key definition
‘Building engineering physics is a key scientific discipline, the understanding of which allows designers to manipulate the thermal and environmental characteristics of buildings to achieve performance criteria without necessarily relying on energy consuming building services installations.’

There are case studies of real projects – the BRE Environmental Building, Eden Court Arts Centre in Inverness and the Innovate Green Office – as well as of research projects, including an Algae House where the hydrogen and bio-mass created by the cultivation of algae is used as a renewable source.

See also one of our recent post’s on low exergy buildings.

Advertisements

Tags: ,

One Response to “Engineering a low carbon built environment”

  1. Energy efficiency: bringing the focus back to the existing housing stock « Building Says:

    […] I can also recommend one of our earlier posts: Engineering a low carbon built environment. […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: