Posts Tagged ‘Glass and glazing’

How to choose safety glass

09/07/2012

Specifying the right type of safety glass for your project can be of vital importance. The Standard Patent Glazing Company is an expert in the field: founded in 1902, the company specialises in the design, manufacture and installation of patent glazing systems for contracts anywhere in the UK. Darren Lister provides this useful guide:

Toughened Safety Glass (Safety Class Rating A)

Toughened safety glass (sometimes called tempered glass) is produced by heating annealed glass to approximately 620ºC, at which point it begins to soften. The surfaces of this heated glass are then cooled rapidly. The technique creates a state of high compression in the outer surfaces of the glass and, as a result – although most other characteristics remain unchanged – the bending strength is increased by a factor of up to five times that of annealed glass.
When broken, the toughened glass fractures into small pieces (called dice). As these particles do not have the sharp edges and dagger points of broken annealed glass, it is generally regarded as a safety glass. While these dice may cause minor cuts, it is very difficult to cause a severe injury with them, provided the fragments are small enough.
Toughened safety glass must be cut to size and have any other processing (such as edge polishing or hole drilling) completed before toughening, because attempts to “work” the glass after toughening will cause it to shatter.
All toughened glass has the highest Safety Rating available, which is Class A to British Standard 6206.

Laminated Safety Glass (Safety Class Rating A or B)

Laminated glass consists of one or more panes of glass attached to and separated from each other by means of interlayer materials. Laminated glass is usually made from annealed glass, although it can also be manufactured using toughened, heat-strengthened or wired glass. It is no stronger than the glass it is made from and cracks as easily. However, when laminated glass breaks, the glass fragments tend to adhere to the interlayer material. Although the glass itself may be annealed glass, on breaking, any sharp cutting edges are not generally exposed. The performance of the glass depends very much on the type of interlayer, and there are many different types. The most common interlayer is PVB (polyvinylbutyral) sheet, which usually sticks to the glass very well and produces a high-energy absorbing interlayer of uniform thickness.

  • 6.4mm thick laminated glass obtains a Class B safety rating to BS 6206.
  • 6.8mm thick laminated glass obtains a Class A safety rating to BS 6206.
  • All laminated glass with a PVB interlayer at least 0.8mm thick obtain a Class A safety rating to BS 6206.

Wired Safety Glass (Safety Class Rating C)

This is a product which has been regarded as a safety glass for many, many years. The wires in wired glass tend to hold the glass together when it is cracked. They perform this function admirably when used in roof glazing and, most particularly, in providing fire resistance, but up until recently most of the wired glass products on the market were not classifiable as safety glass to BS 6206. Wired glass is now supplied with thicker and stronger wires to obtain a safety Class C rating to BS 6206.

View The Standard Patent Glazing Company’s beautiful photo gallery of completed work here.

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Case study: soundproofing a music room using folding sliding doors

09/07/2012

Doors, by nature, will allow a certain amount of noise to escape. However, there are specialist designs and techniques available to help alleviate the level of audible sound. Here is how Baca Architects and Sunfold Systems solved a musical soundproofing dilemma.

The clients wanted the music room to have an open, airy feel

A client approached Baca Architects, requesting that as part of their home they wanted a music room. This room was to form an important element of their living and leisure time.

A central point of the house was perfect for their requirements for entertaining guests and a key part of the family’s time together, but when it came to the times where privacy was required, they needed to be able to close the doors for recording purposes.

To create the open feel the clients required whilst also having the option to shut off the music area, lead architect Robert Barker wanted to incorporate interior folding sliding doors as an effective and visually appealing solution to the overall project. “Noise transfers so easily through most doors, so it was important for the internal folding sliding doors we used to be flawless, to create a balanced sound level,” he commented.

The music room had to be soundproofed for recording purposes

Robert chose to use Sunfold Systems’ timber range of folding sliding doors, the SFK69 painted in white. This is the highest specification timber system available, and is manufactured from triple laminated solid timber sections. As noise control was key, it was vital that the joints, tracks, frame construction and head detail connectors had no air gaps, to make sure that there was no flanking sound either side.

By using slim-width panels and through the natural slim sightlines of the SFK69, both the structure and the appearance of the internal sliding door system worked well together to achieve the desired effect.

Soundproofing sliding folding doors

Liquid glass: nanotechnology in architecture

16/12/2009

Nanotechnology up close (image: Treehugger)

What is nanotechnology, and what implications could it have for the built environment? Jeremy Elton Jacquot outlines some of the debate surrounding this nascent science: “Not since the advent of genetic engineering have environmentalists, scientists and policymakers been so divided over a new technology.”

Neil McLelland of Nanopool, however, is excited about the prospect. Guest editing Glasswire, an independent newsletter for the glass and glazing industry, he says

Nano is an overworked yet often ill understood term. It of course refers to the world of the very small. Objects that have dimensions of 1 nano metre are 1 billionth of a metre thin; but this fascinating number is not nearly as impressive as the way that nano materials function. Due to the attributes of materials at the quantum level, we will be able to create glass that is thinner, lighter, thermally more efficient yet significantly more durable than the forms that are currently available. Frames will be made of nano composites that are self-healing and nano metals will be significantly lighter and stronger. Liquid glass technology is a perfect example of what is ahead.”

ESI references: